Remote Viewing with Lyn Buchanan


Lyn Buchanan worked at the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) as one of the government’s “Controlled Remote Viewers” for eight years, and by the time he retired in 1992 he was also the unit’s trainer. He now heads “Problems Solutions Innovations,” a New Mexico-based company that trains and provides intelligence-gathering services for individuals, corporations, police and other public-service agencies. He recounts his experiences as a remote viewer for the U.S. Government and the work he now does for the private sector in his book, “The Seventh Sense: The Secrets of Remote Viewing as Told by a “Psychic Spy” for the U.S. Military.” Lyn was also one of the founders of the International Remote Viewing Association.

 

MTPS:

lyn_buchananFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to talk with me – I really appreciate it. And before we start, I’d just like to direct readers to your website – www.crviewer.com. Under the site’s “Free Resources” tab, readers can click on links for both FAQs and terminology. There are also exercises/targets that readers can use for trying remote viewing and/or dowsing on their own.

Lyn Buchanan:

I’d like to let everyone know that doing the exercises and accessing these targets does not require signing up for anything. It also doesn’t leave “cookies” on your computer, nor track you in any way at all. If you don’t do well, no one knows. If you do well, you have full bragging rights to the world.

MTPS:

I’d also like to point out that remote viewing encompasses an enormous amount of specific modalities and concepts that are specific to the RV process – we don’t have time to go over it all in this interview. But to use the definition of the International Remote Viewing Association (IRVA), remote viewing is:

A mental faculty that allows a perceiver (a “viewer”) to describe or give details about a target that is inaccessible to normal senses due to distance, time, or shielding. For example, a viewer might be asked to describe a location on the other side of the world, which he or she has never visited; or a viewer might describe an event that happened long ago; or describe an object sealed in a container or locked in a room; or perhaps even describe a person or an activity; all without being told anything about the target — not even its name or designation.

 

Lyn Buchanan:

Right. The main thing to address here is that the military used a scientific process called “Controlled Remote Viewing” (CRV). It was developed and tested in the laboratories at Stanford Research Institute and used by the military to help rescue hostages, predict the plans and intentions of foreign leaders, and find downed airplanes, etc. It was real-world nuts and bolts stuff. . Public knowledge of the military’s project came about by being splattered across sensational headlines as “psychic soldiers”. The articles, however, gave no information about what it was – just calling us, “psychics”. The term, “remote viewing” was then immediately taken over by many psychics as a more scientifically acceptable term. It became the new buzzword for “psychic,” when in actual fact, the “Controlled Remote Viewing” used in the military is very, very different from what most people these days are calling “remote viewing”. That means that an extremely high percentage of the “remote viewing” information on the internet is actually old teachings packaged under a new title, and has nothing to do with the methodology that was developed and used to save lives in the military. That doesn’t mean that they are bad or ineffective, just that the term, “remote viewing” doesn’t really apply.

MTPS:

I understand that you were part of the U.S. Army’s remote viewing unit – was it called Star Gate at that time?

Lyn Buchanan:

That was one of the code names given to the project. Basically, as soon as people in the government found out what we did as “Project xxxx”, that project was abandoned and the next day, we went back to work under a new project name. There were seven names, in all.

MTPS:

I also understand that you were personally recruited for that position. Could you talk a little bit about that?

Lyn Buchanan:

BrainwavesWell, parts of that are still classified, but basically, I had what turned out to be a major psychokinetic event in Augsburg, Germany that destroyed a huge number of intelligence computers. It was witnessed by an officer who was trained to identify psychokinetic events, and who reported it to General Stubblebine, commander of the U.S. Army’s Intelligence and Security Command. The general took me to D.C. in hopes of starting a “PK” unit that would, at first, destroy enemy computers, with the end goal of learning how to mentally control them instead. That way, for example, if an enemy launched missiles at us, we could control the guidance computers and send the missiles into the ocean or back at them. Congress had been caught funding “mind control” experiments in the ’60s, and because of that, wouldn’t fund the PK project. So, General Stubblebine took me out to Ft. Meade, Maryland to the CRV unit and put me there. When they “read me on” to the project, I thought I was being punked and was on some kind of “Candid Camera” stunt. I mean, “a mental military”? That’s science fiction stuff. But as I watched them work, I found out just how real and fascinating it was, and as the saying goes, I took to it like a duck to water.

MTPS:

I am familiar with the concept of remote viewing and how the USG used it for intelligence. However, I was surprised when I came across your book, “The Seventh Sense,” and found out that someone was still teaching this stuff.

Lyn Buchanan:

A couple of us old timers from the unit are teaching it to the public. What we teach generally gets lost in all the internet hype, but we’re quietly teaching people how to do the work and then using them in police work, business consultation, stock market work, etc. Like most people from the old intelligence gathering days, we pretty much work quietly and don’t loudly beat drums or blow horns to advertise ourselves.

MTPS:

I guess I had assumed that once the Army shut down the program, RV only continued existing through a few scattered programs at university labs.

Lyn Buchanan:

No. Like most of the developments the military does, this one has a lot of civilian applications, and so has moved quite well into the civilian sector. Like I say, we work for businesses and police, and do some medical work (although the laws are generally so archaic in this respect that we tread very, very carefully in that legal minefield.).

MTPS:

Was it difficult to transition remote viewing from an intelligence program to civilian uses?

Lyn Buchanan:

Not at all. It works, and you can’t keep success down.

MTPS:

But at one time it had been rather thoroughly discredited.

Lyn Buchanan:

Telescope brainThere had been a very sloppy attempt to discredit it by a rather flimsy and ill-formed study by the American Institute of Research (AIR). That study enrolled Jessica Utts, a statistician and Ray Hymen, an “Amazing-Randi-wannabe” debunker. The statistician found that our work was statistically significant and urged further study. The debunker, of course, went out of his way to discredit everything he saw, and in the end, even wrote in his evaluation that there should be no further use or evaluation of CRV until the science of statistics could get its act together. In the end, the unit was no longer funded – not so much because of that study, but because intelligence budgets were being drastically reduced at the end of the cold war, and it was either stop funding the embarrassment of what was now being touted as “psychic soldiers”, or keep trained, veteran ground agents on the payrolls. Well, in that situation, I think that they made the best choice in a bad situation.

In the end, though, the greatest amount of discrediting came once our existence hit the newspapers and the internet. Like I say, what most people know of remote viewing these days comes from the exaggerated claims and hype of “experts”, most of whom don’t even know what CRV is.

MTPS:

You have a training program that teaches CRV. How many students take your courses every year?

Lyn Buchanan:

Well, it used average between only about 25 to 35 a year. Training must be done on an individual or small group basis. It’s not a classroom type of thing. Due to many factors not related to CRV, I am presently in semi-retirement and only teaching special applications classes to those advanced students who need them to further their personal work. These days, I’m writing more books and articles, being available to help my students, working operational and research projects, and answering questions on email lists, Facebook, etc. Four of my star students, however, are now teaching CRV, and doing extremely well at it. When someone comes to me for training these days, I refer that person to them, knowing that the teaching that person gets will be individualized, valid, correct, and of very high quality.

MTPS:

I’m curious, how many did you teach when you were still running the training program side of your business….for example, how many students did you have over the past 20 years? I’m just trying to get a handle on the interest in this by the general public.

Lyn Buchanan:

In addition to those I taught in various government agencies, for whom I don’t keep records, I have had 740 students. I know that because we assign “viewer numbers” to each viewer. The reason for that is so that their personal information will never be given to anyone. You never know whether the police you are working for are honest cops, or whether any customer will misuse a viewer. We have, therefore, project managers who stand as a protective shield between the customers and the viewers. The Project Managers report all viewers’ work by these numbers instead of by their names, to protect them from people who might either want to harm them for the knowledge they uncover or begin invading their privacy, asking for favors, free work, or for other reasons.

MTPS:

Does remote viewing exist outside the United States?

Lyn Buchanan:

Yes. I have had many students from other countries, and have traveled to other countries to teach it. It is a talent that, in my opinion, will raise the level of Humankind. In fact, one of my students who is now teaching it, lives in Dublin, Ireland, and is an extremely good teacher.

MTPS:

Do you know whether remote viewers overseas are connected to their governments or do they do it for private or commercial reasons?

Lyn Buchanan:

SpyWell, that is sort of a complex question. I suspect that the answer is, “yes” to all three. The fact is that the U.S. was not the first or only country to have “psychic spies”. We developed it as a response to the fact that Russia already had a “psychic spying” team and was actually getting our classified information. “Psychic spying” is not something new. It has been going on for hundreds of years, just rarely in as a highly developed manner as CRV. Right now, as far as I know, the U.S. is about the only country whose military or government does NOT have such an effort going on. That puts us at a disadvantage to their spying on us again.. It seems that our politicians always have to learn lessons the hard way.

MTPS:

Your organization offers several different training courses in remote viewing – basic, intermediate, advanced, post graduate, monitor, analyst, etc. – it seems like an awful lot. How many courses would a person need to take in order to learn how to CRV?

Lyn Buchanan:

Two. The basic and intermediate courses teach a person how to do about 90% of all the work that will be required of a viewer in actual operations. The advanced course is for those who want to go on to be “world class”. The other courses are for those who will work with CRVers in organizations, teams, etc. BTW: As far as I know, the CRV courses are the only ones offered that actually take a viewer beyond the basic two levels. From the first day of training, we train towards making a viewer operational. I have also trained and established a few full CRV units, equivalent to the military’s, for certain corporations, giving them a definite advantage in the workplace.

The other courses are generally for teaching support staff. However, we do have special-applications course, such as the Medical Apps course, the Associative Remote Viewing (ARV) course, that teaches you how to use the skills you’ve learned to gain “limited decision” information. “Limited decision” information means such things as being able to tell an investor which stock to buy or sell and whether and when that stock’s value will rise or fall. Another example is casino games, such as roulette, where the choices are even/odd, red/black/green, or the36 numbers on the table.

MTPS:

Do you have a typical student?

Lyn Buchanan:

When all this moved into the civilian sector, I was very surprised to see that interested people came almost evenly from just about every field, race, gender, nationality, etc. I don’t think that there is really any one group that stands out.

MTPS:

And what does he or she want to do with remote viewing?

Lyn Buchanan:

Most want to learn it for personal purposes. Many are just curious. Some want to learn it to help other people. Some are driven by world injustices to want to use it for catching criminals, bringing missing children home, stopping animal cruelty, etc. A few want to become professional CRVers, but for the most part, the motives are personal.

MTPS:

I assume that the time that remote viewers were mainly employed by the USG for intelligence purposes is a thing of the past.

Lyn Buchanan:

If you single it down to the US, you’d be right. If you take out the US from that question and put in the letters of almost any other government, you’d be wrong. Many other governments are capitalizing on what we developed, and some are probably even using it against us.

MTPS:

I understand from your book, “The Seventh Sense,” and from your website that you have done a work a lot with law enforcement. Could you say a little about that?

Lyn Buchanan:

When we work for a police department, it is always as just another investigative tool at their disposal. We don’t ask for credit, nor do we go out to the public beating our chests and taking credit for anything. You’d be amazed how many psychics and other forms of remote viewers will work for a police department and head straight for the newspaper office to try and get publicity for it, or get on the internet and brag about how they solved the case for the police. Those people never get asked again, nor do they get referred. And rightly so. The police are absolutely non-receptive to those types of people.

By the way, we always do all police work pro bono. The only things we ask of them is 1) to keep our involvement quiet – we don’t want credit; and 2) to give either a department baseball cap or coffee mug to each of the viewers involved. If you go to any of our police caseworkers’ homes, you will find a shelf or cabinet somewhere in the home filled with baseball caps and coffee mugs from different police departments. It’s a silent little badge of merit for the viewers who have helped.

MTPS:

Do you frequently find you have to work to win the police departments over?

Lyn Buchanan:

Well, not if we have been referred to them by other departments. Success breeds success, and the departments talk to each other. However, when, for example, the parent of a missing child or victim of a crime has urged the police to call us, while the police are obligated to do so, they tend to be very skeptical. That’s a good thing, and I advise it, by the way. What they want more than anything else is the names of other departments who have used us. Well, just as we don’t tell that we’ve worked a case, we also don’t tell for whom we worked . So, we don’t give out the names of the departments for whom we’ve worked. But we have several departments who are willing to talk to them and vouch for our work. I gain permission from the new department to send their contact information to the old departments, and the old departments can call them, if they want.

MTPS:

And….even if they get results with you, do you find they are reluctant to talk about it?

Lyn Buchanan:

Yes. Always. In fact, we warn them not to, since any such talk can give opposing lawyers in a case an opportunity to ridicule the department for “using crazy psychics” and for not being good enough police to do their jobs without help. Such things as that can sway juries. In many cases, especially where the detective’s chain of command would literally fire the detective for using “those crazy psychics”, we turn in our reports on Anonymous Witness forms. In many of those cases, we don’t even get our mugs or baseball caps, but we do help in getting bad guys off the streets, and that’s reward enough.

MTPS:

When I look at the available literature, I see RV being associated with both the intelligence and law enforcement communities. Is it being used for anything else? Examples?

Lyn Buchanan:

BrainmanAbsolutely. We’re being used by businesses, by stock market investors, by R&D research facilities, and space-exploration companies, as well as in some medical cases. We found that real estate people who normally show, for example, ten houses and hope to make a single sale every week or so will take our courses and report back that they now show only three houses and make several sales a week, on a routine basis. One of our viewers is a paramedic and does a short session at the beginning of each shift to see if any special equipment will be needed for emergencies that day or night. They have been equipped with all the special equipment needed for every emergency so far, because of his viewing. One mother has used it to predict the outcome of every one of her son’s football games throughout the year. Since CRV is a new branch of science about the human mind and brain, we have a lot of students who are psychiatrists, psychologists, therapists, hypnotherapists, etc. After all, the subconscious mind also knows why you do those things you don’t want to do, but do them, anyway, and why you don’t do those things you want to, but don’t. CRV allows you to communicate with the subconscious, and simply ask it what it knows. CRV is in no way restricted to spy work.   Like I say, people come here mostly for their own interests, and as they do, we find new uses for the science.

MTPS:

When I read about RV, several people seem to be using it for metaphysical ends, such as contacting UFOs, and investigating past lives, etc. Do you do this?

Lyn Buchanan:

No, I don’t. When the choice is between satisfying my curiosity on what we call “esoteric” questions and helping to bring missing kids home or get bad guys off the streets, then for me, the importance of UFOs pales. Also, we never give metaphysical targets as training and practice targets because there’s no way to get feedback to help the student learn. Those targets are valid uses for CRV, but I discourage students from doing them until they have had enough training and experience to establish a track record of their accuracy and dependability on targets that do have feedback. Otherwise, there is no way to tell how dependable any information they receive is. Once trained and established, many viewers take on those targets, and I’m personally glad they do, because they gain valuable insights into those fields. But as for me, I don’t.

MTPS:

If you could leave readers with one idea about the future of RV, what would it be?

LBuchananLyn Buchanan:

Well, the future’s not what it used to be. At one point, the prediction was that it would one day fall out of favor and go back into secret work for the government. However, it has proven itself to be too useful in the civilian arena. I’m hoping that as CRV very quietly proves itself in the civilian world, hype and wild claims will fall away. I see a time when people will use remote viewing to make lives better and work easier. For example, with remote viewing we could drastically decrease medical misdiagnoses. In law enforcement, many innocent people go to jail while guilty people go free – we could change that with CRV. And imagine how efficient government would become if the citizenry could remote view how their tax dollars were being used and which politicians were honest.   I would like CRV to become a valued tool for everyone. It now looks like it has the potential to do that, and I’m glad.

 

 

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