Heaven Is for Healing: An Interview With Dr. Joseph Gallenberger

Dr. Joseph Gallenberger is a clinical psychologist with thirty years experience as a therapist. Nearly three years ago I posted an interview with him regarding his work on psychokinesis -, the ability to influence matter through non-physical means – and the workshops in which he taught participants how to bend metal spoons and sprout seeds in their hands. In this interview, however, Dr. Gallenberger leads us in a different direction, examining life after death and just what it means to be beings of spirit and soul.  His new book, Heaven Is for Healing: A Soul’s Journey After Suicide, is not your ordinary, everyday book, but it is exactly the story we all need to hear.  See the end of the article for a more extensive bio and links to his website.

MTPS:

I know you primarily through your explorations of psychokinesis and manifestation – bending spoons, sprouting seeds and enjoying amazing luck in the Las Vegas casinos, etc.  Your latest book Heaven Is for Healing, is different; it focuses on suicide and what happens when you pass over.  Could you tell us a bit about why you came to write this?

Dr. Gallenberger:

Actually, it was the events that I talk about in Heaven Is for Healing – the suicide of my beloved brother Pete – that caused me to begin my exploration into manifestation.  My brother Pete was a good man – not only was he my best friend, he was handsome and hard-working.  But he just couldn’t get it together job-wise.  It was hard to understand how such a good man could have difficulty creating a better reality for himself.  My work with manifestation helps other people do what Pete was unable to do – create a different, better reality in which to live.

I originally wrote about Pete’s suicide in my book Brothers Forever; in it, I wrote about what it was like to go through the suicide of a family member.  But that was 20 years ago and a lot has happened since then – not only to me, but also to Pete on the other side. I think it’s important to let people know what happens when they pass over, and to start talking openly about the issues surrounding suicide.

MTPS:

Death, in general, isn’t an easy topic to discuss.  Suicide is even more difficult to address.

Dr. Gallenberger:

We need to look at how society treats suicide and how to help people left behind.  I was raised in a Catholic family.  My mother was very devout.  The grief she felt at the death of her child was exponentially magnified when she imagined him suffering eternal damnation.  I once went on a tour in New Orleans and our guide said that in earlier times those who committed suicide were cut into pieces and cast to the alligators rather than being buried in consecrated ground so that demons could torment them through eternity. Attitudes may not be so extreme anymore, but the issue of suicide is still handled punitively.  We need to have a conversation about it rather than sweeping it under a rug of shame and guilt.  People need to know that the afterlife is a compassionate and caring place.

MTPS:

And you learned that heaven is a compassionate place from your brother himself after he passed away.  Could you tell us about that?

Dr. Gallenberger:

My brother, Pete, besides having difficulty finding a job, was in chronic physical pain and depression. He planned it all out – it wasn’t some sort of spontaneous act.  In the days leading up to his suicide, Pete cleaned his apartment, prepaid his own funeral, packed up his belongings to be sent to me, and then wrapped his head in a towel just before he shot himself in the head so he wouldn’t make a mess for anyone.  Our entire family was devastated.

I wanted to know that Pete was all right.  Luckily for me, the first Lifeline Program at the Monroe Institute (TMI) took place the week before Pete’s death, and I was a participant.  In the Lifeline Program, the students learn how to contact the souls of people who have passed away, but who are unable to progress due to their own fears or belief systems.  I had a strong expectation that either I or others in the program would be able to contact Pete.  Thankfully I was right; within days I was getting messages from various sources that Pete was okay.

MTPS:

Despite these quick, early assurances you wanted to know more.  In your book, you describe how you contacted a trusted psychic channel to help you to communicate with Pete.  I found this curious because you yourself are not only very intuitive, you also have direct experience with reaching out to the souls of people who have passed over.  Why did you feel the need to go through a channel in order to contact your brother?

Dr. Gallenberger:

I was experiencing extreme grief.  Strong negative emotions tend to block communication with those in spirit.  This is why one often finds, for example, that when a man dies, a message may not be received by his grieving widow, but by his niece who then can pass it on to the widow.  I had a difficult time reaching that state of receptive calm so necessary for getting messages.  The channel I dealt with had never met Pete and had never seen a photo of him, but right away she was passing me information that had all the signatures of Pete’s personality and character.  And a bit later I was able to establish my own communication with him.

MTPS:

What did Pete talk about?

Dr. Gallenberger:

Communication with Peter has been a project that has spanned over two decades, and it has changed over the years.  When he first died, very eager to communicate, Pete expressed concern for those of us left behind suffering because of him.  He also had experiences that are commonly reported by others who have either had Near Death Experiences or who have communicated with those who have died – meeting with loved ones who had already passed over, a life review, and classes, etc.

MTPS:

Is the afterlife different for people who commit suicide than for those who die in other ways?

Dr. Gallenberger:

We need to understand that you’re still the same person after you die as you were during your physical life here on Earth – you bring your thoughts, emotions and free choice over with you.  So we participate in creating our own heavenly or hellish environment there, much as we do here. Unsurprisingly, many people who commit suicide have an internal level of darkness that needs to be addressed.  But each person is different.  A person who suicides when, for example, suffering from a terminal illness and facing increasing levels of pain has a much different experience than someone like my brother who suffered for decades, someone who commits murder-suicide, or someone who commits suicide on impulse, such as an eight-year-old boy recently did after being bullied.

People who have had difficult or challenging lives often go through a period of rest before they go through their life reviews.  Those who have undergone particularly disturbing experiences are often put in a sort of spiritual coma, during which time they receive unconscious treatment until they reach the point they are capable of looking at what they have done or what has been done to them.  Pete had our equivalent of a couple of weeks of rest, then completed his life review in segments; he would review a portion of his life, then rest, then be ready to review the next portion.  After that there is something akin to a classroom environment in which people learn things that are important to their own evolution.  A couple of things Pete needed to focus on were understanding feminine energy and learning how our emotions, combined with thought, create reality. For example, a person will be walked through their life and made to consider what could have happened had they chosen “A” rather than “B.”  While there’s no judgment, they learn different, more life-affirming ways they could have handled the situations they faced.

Through all this, Pete continued his efforts to help those he had left behind grieving.  In particular, he seems to have an ongoing relationship with my daughter, with whom he was quite close while he was alive.  He seems to have assumed the role much like a guardian angel with her.

MTPS:

You’ve said that not only is there no judgment in the afterlife, but that individuals receive treatment to help them heal from negative life experiences.  It almost sounds as if suicide would be an okay option for some people.

Dr. Gallenberger:

I don’t encourage suicide because, as I mentioned before, you take it all with you – your significant emotions and thoughts.  Nothing is magically resolved by dying because you are still the same person.  Just as here, there are resources there to help, if you choose to avail yourself of them, but physical life here is precious and unique in its opportunities for growth if you stick it out.

Suicide is also a poor decision because of the absolute devastation is causes to families and friends.  People have a poor knowledge of their own impact, and in most cases greatly underestimate it.  After Pete’s suicide, our family got notes and letters from bank tellers and cashiers telling us how Pete had touched their own lives.  While Pete expressed appreciation for love and acceptance, he had trouble accepting he was valuable to others.

I would like to encourage anyone who is contemplating suicide to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. I called it myself several times to see what the experience would be like.  Each time I called someone answered on the first ring, and the people on the other end sounded compassionate and caring.

MTPS:

What is the point of training and classes in the afterlife?  What do individuals do with what they’ve learned?

Dr. Gallenberger:

Well Pete, at least, is looking at incarnating again.  But since he had many issues that proved challenging to him during his physical life, he will likely first complete a couple of “sims” – simulated lives that feel real in every way, but which are completed without a physical body.  Learning in sims is less intense than learning in a physical life and so may be slower, but time means little so there is no hurry.

MTPS:

Was there anything that surprised Pete about the afterlife?

Dr. Gallenberger:

The fact that there was no judgment.  In fact, one of the first times we made contact with him after his suicide, he sent us the image of a street sign with the word “Judgment” x-ed out.  Many people would have considered Pete’s life a failure, but the truth is no one is a good judge of how they are doing in their own life, let alone the lives of others. Pete came into life doubting that love existed, and left knowing that it did.  That, in and of itself, was a great spiritual victory.  My mother had always expressed a fear of getting Alzheimer’s disease, so it was upsetting that she spent the last few years of her life in a nursing home suffering from that very illness. Looking at it from the outside, most of us would consider her situation to have been tragic.  But when we made contact with her after she passed away, my mother indicated to us that for her on an unconscious basis, the Alzheimer’s was a sort of tool; it allowed her to forget much religious guilt and it provided the necessary time for her beloved husband – to whom she had been married 64 years – to learn to cook, keep house and to socialize without her before she died.

MTPS:

Suicide of a loved one is an extremely painful experience for those who are left behind.  In many cases the surviving family and friends not only struggle with loss, but also with feelings of shame and guilt.  What did you learn, through your experience with Pete’s death, that might help them?

Dr. Gallenberger:

The main point to keep in mind is that there is no such thing as suffering for all eternity; there is no judgment, and there is great healing available for their love one on the other side.  Families can get stuck in a loop of agonizing about what they could have done to have prevented it.  There are feelings of both shock and shame, which can be very isolating.  Our culture tells us that a year is sufficient as a period of mourning, but grief takes its own time and may be extended when the loss is great.  It is good to increase self-care and counter the isolation with actively reaching out for support. For me, both nature and music were very healing.

MTPS:

You’ve also designed The Ocean Heart as a companion CD/download guided meditation to Heaven Is for Healing.  While I haven’t been through the experience of having a loved one commit suicide, I downloaded it prior to doing this interview.  I was surprised – at one point in the meditation I found myself weeping, which helped me heal my own losses.  It makes me think that even though your nominal focus is on suicide, the deeper issue is what it means to be human writ large.

Dr. Gallenberger:

After my brother’s death, I felt like I had a broken heart.  This was partly because Pete had died, but also I unconsciously closed my heart down because I never wanted to be hurt again.  This isolated me from people and life.  I finally developed a different image which allowed me to fully embrace life again and yet be better protected from shattering hurt.  In The Ocean Heart mediation, the listener imagines their heart as a vast ocean of love; if you want someone to come into your heart, they can enter with no resistance, much like putting a hand in water and being enveloped completely.  If they leave, much like a hand leaving water, your ocean heart goes back to being complete.

You’re right that this meditation has applications greater than the loss of a loved one.  It could be used for any loss, for handling the world’s tension, to address disappointment in one’s career, etc.  It’s for any time when you might tend to reject things first, instead of opening up your heart.  The CD was made using advanced brain wave technologies, which enables even people who have never meditated before to reach very deep access to spiritual help, so it’s for everyone.

MTPS:

We’ve just spent a lot of time discussing suicide.  I would imagine that many people would think that this doesn’t apply to them.  Is there a greater application to what we’ve been talking about?

Dr. Gallenberger:

The greater application is that we all suicide a little bit when we don’t live up to our own potential.  If we don’t live our life to its fullest, we cut off our expression of that potential, just as suicide radically ends our potential in this physical life.

It boils down to each day continuing to choose either love or fear.  I don’t think love has any opposite, but fear can cloud love.  One of my favorite sayings is, “Fear is expensive, love is priceless.  Choose wisely.”

This can be challenging to do, particularly in today’s society where there is a lot of fear.  And if we keep choosing fear, we will experience reduced freedom, safety and growth as individuals and as a culture.  I would urge people to seek out people, books and experiences that encourage us to choose love over fear.  By using meditations such as The Ocean Heart, we can gentle and strengthen our reactions towards the environment in which we life. Because whether to choose love or fear is not just important to individuals, it is also critical for today’s society.

 

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Dr. Joseph Gallenberger is a clinical psychologist with thirty years experience as a therapist. In 1992 be began to investigate psychokinesis (PK), the ability to influence matter through non-physical means. PK can be used to illuminate light bulbs, bend metal and plastic, sprout seeds in your hand, influence computers, dice and slot machines, and create healing and abundance – all just using the power of your mind.

After achieving powerful PK results at a university laboratory, Dr. Gallenberger has used his discoveries to host over eight-five Inner Vegas Adventures where his students achieve dramatic physical and psychological healing, strong influence over dice and slot machines, and many marvelous manifestations in their lives at home.

Dr. Gallenberger is a senior facilitator at The Monroe Institute and developed the Institute’s highly successful MC² program which teaches psychokinesis, healing, and manifestation. Joe also developed SyncCreation®, a Course in Manifestation which is the home study version of the MC² program. He is also the creator of seven CD/downloads: Manifesting with Hemi-Sync, Partner’s Meditation, Liquid Luck, Abundance Waterfall and his latest Healing Heart, Abundant Heart and Ocean Heart.  His book Inner Vegas: Creating Miracles, Abundance and Health takes a wild ride into world of psychokinesis where mind, energized by the heart, influences matter. It reveals what is possible when we apply intention and heart-centered energy to mold reality to our desires.  His Book Liquid Luck: The Good Fortune Handbook, summarizes decades of manifesting knowledge.

In his latest book, Heaven Is for Healing, Dr. Gallenberger sheds light on coping with the loss of a loved one to suicide, and the soul connections and everlasting love we all have.  He also created a companion meditation CD/download The Ocean Heart.

For more information visit Dr. Joseph Gallenberger’s website: www.SyncCreation.com.

 

 

 

 

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